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Bones, Genomics, and the Ethics of (In)visibility

photo of Dr Watkins
October 21, 2020 - 4:00pm
ONLINE-ONLY EVENT LIMITED TO STANFORD STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND STAFF. ADVANCE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED WITH A STANFORD EMAIL ADDRESS.
Professor Watkin's research at American University, focuses on the biological and social history of African Americans living in the 19th and 20th century urban US. She  began this journey studying the health consequences of poverty and inequality through skeletal and documentary data analysis, with a focus on the W. Montague Cobb skeletal collection. This unique anatomical collection is made up of DC residents who died in the city between 1930 and 1969. There is extensive cultural information associated with the collection that makes it ideal for examining various biocultural interrelationships.
She is currently building on this work with a broader look at how Black bodies are positioned as biological and social products in biological anthropology – as researchers and subjects. A key area of concern is the continued dearth of POC and other minority researchers in the field despite robust critiques of scientific racism. This suggests the need for a closer examination of social relations in our field, for which Black feminist theory and critiques of science are an underutilized resource. She uses the work of scholars such as Sylvia Wynter and Hortense Spillers to analyze the ways that scientific practices can move toward methodological and theoretical innovation - while maintaining epistemological underpinnings that render ideal physical and intellectual humanity as white, male, cisgendered and heterosexual. Therefore, scientific practices continue to structurally support the marginalization of scholarship produced by people who are not a part of racial, gendered, sexual, class and physical majorities. This in turn normalizes their place as subjects in the research process, versus knowledge producers.
 

Daphne

Daphne Martschenko - Postdoctoral fellow at the Stanford University Center for Biomedical Ethics

Dr. Martschenko received a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Cambridge in 2019. Her research identifies ethical, legal, and social considerations arising from genetics research and clinical practice and related policy recommendations to address these issues. Her work advocates for and facilitates cross-disciplinary research efforts that promote socially responsible communication of social science genomics research findings. Prior projects include an ‘adversarial collaborative’ effort with social science genomics researchers to explore recent developments in Genetics and Education (AERA Open, 2019) and guest editing a Special Issue devoted to the introduction of the biosocial sciences into Education (Research in Education, 2020).

 

Lecture Date: Wednesday, October 21

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This is  an event in the series of speakers for STS 51, a weekly lecture series exploring the intersections of race, racism, and scientific practice

Event Sponsor: 
Program in Science, Technology and Society, African and African-American Studies, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, Center for African Studies, McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society, Center for Biomedical Ethics, Digital Civil Society Lab, Department of Communications, Program in History and Philosophy of Science, Department of Anthropology, the Steve Luby research group, Program in Human Biology, Stanford Earth, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Bio Policy & Leadership in Society, Department of Bioengineering, Center for South Asia, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, and the Ethics, Society, and Technology Hub
Contact Email: 
jwreid@stanford.edu

This event belongs to the following series